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Boston Terrier Dog Breed Information

A cute Boston Terrier enjoying some lazy time

Boston Terriers, as the name suggests, originate from America. Unfortunately, they were originally bred for the disgusting means of being fighting dogs. However, today they are considered to be gentle and affectionate companions. The breeds sweet tuxedo- like markings have earned them the nickname of “American gentleman”. 

Here’s everything you need to know about them:

Physical Attributes

A Boston Terrier is small, sturdy, and has a compact build. They weigh approximately 25 pounds, and they can get to 17 inches tall. They have round, large round eyes that are dark and an inquisitive expression.

While most Boston Terriers have small erect ears, some have floppy ears. A flat square head at the top, short muzzle, and broad chest are also noticeable characteristics of the breed.

Personality

These dogs are happy and friendly, which often makes them a good fit for families and urban dwellers. They are good companions to children and tend to adjust to family life well. They also tend to be good with other pets, there are many anecdotes of Boston Terriers and house cats becoming best friends. 

Their energy levels are mainly based on who they are around most. If you get excited, your dog will be very energetic. While if you are an island of calm, your terrier will reflect this.

Exercise & Nutrition

If you like running and dream of taking your dog on runs with you, this will not be a good fit for you. Boston Terriers would rather play fetch or chase a ball then engage in serious exercise. They are not built for distance running and overly strenuous activities may lead to breathing problems or heat stroke.

This is because short-nosed dogs struggle to cool the air going into their lungs as efficiently as breeds with longer noses. As such this breed is particularly susceptible to heat stress. Their short coat also means that extremely cold weather is very uncomfortable for them.

Boston Terriers love their food, and are not picky eaters. Like humans, your furry friend is a unique individual whose dietary needs will depend on:

  • Metabolism
  • How active they are 
  • Size

Experts recommend giving dry foods measured as 0.5 cups to 1.5 cups daily. You can divide this into two meals.  You have to make sure they are eating the right food appropriate for their age. Find out from Boston Terrier experts the best thing to feed them and what to avoid.

A Boston Terrier

Grooming

This breeds thin and glossy coat means that they do not get dirty quickly, making them relatively low maintenance.

If you are looking for a low-maintenance dog, this one is perfect. They have thin, glossy coats that do not get dirty fast. A quick brush will often do the trick to keep your American Gentleman looking dapper. Do not bathe your dog too often, as they tend to lose the waterproofing oils that are in their skin. 

When bathing, check their eyes for gunk and wipe it with a warm cloth. Their nails are sensitive and traditional clippers would hurt them. Have your vet recommend something for you or consult with a pet groomer.

Illnesses

Just like in humans, illnesses may be expensive to treat. With vaccines and other preventive measures, you may be able to prevent your dog from certain illnesses. Boston Terriers are prone to some health concerns that include:

  • Heart disease
  • Allergies
  • Obesity
  • Deafness
  • Spinal problems
  • Eye disorders

Do You Have A Boston Terrier?

Share your Boston Terrier dog breed information, facts and stories in the comments below!

Click here for more breed guides, including Dalmatians, Dachshunds or Beagles.

Written by Michael (Dog Furiendly)

Hey there all you cool canines and puppers! I'm Michael, the Sales and Barketing Manager at Dog Furiendly. You'll usually find me working in the pack to bring you some of the very best dog friendly locations across the UK.

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